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Entry into Italy

 

Entrare in Italia
Visa, visa denial, visa extension, visa for purposes of: joining family member, work, business, marriage, foreigners, study bursary, re-entry into Italy.
To find out if you need an entry visa for Italy, visit the database Visa for Italy Visa for Italy.
After having clicked on the question “Do you need a visa?”, and selected the country you are a citizen of, the country where you have registered residency, and the length of stay and reason, you will see if you need to obtain a visa for entry into Italy. All types of visas list the documentation required.
Visa applications must be submitted to the Embassy or Consulate of Italy, a list of which is provided on the Visa for Italy database.
For further information see Responsibility for issuing visas.
List of foreign embassies and consulates in Italy
The person that must apply for the visa is the foreign visitor, who can do so at the visa office of the Italian embassy or consulate authorised for the place where that person is a registered resident.
For more information see Procedures for issuing visas.
List of Italian embassies and consulates
The Visa for Italy database lists all the documents required, but the visa office may also request other documentation depending on your case. We suggest you get specific information at the visa office authorised for your area.
The terms for issuance of a Schengen visa are listed in art. 23 of the Visa Code: 15 days, extendable in specific cases to 60. The timeframes for issuance of national visas are set out in section 5 (8) of Presidential Decree 394 of 31.8.1999, as amended by D.P.R. 334/2004, which states that the diplomatic/consular mission, "after ascertaining that the application can be entertained, and after conducting the necessary investigations in relation to the visa, including the preventive security checks, shall issue the visa within 90 days of the date of application" (30 days for paid employment, 120 days for self-employment).
For more information see Terms for issuance of visas
There are two timeframes for an entry visa:
  • Duration is the actual maximum period of stay permitted
  • Validity is the time within which the visa can be used.
A visa’s validity is generally longer that its duration, and it establishes from when and until when the visa can be used. The visa expires on the last day of its validity, and as from that date third country visitors are required to leave the Schengen area, otherwise their presence becomes illegal.

For example: if a Schengen visa has a duration of 30 days and a validity of 90 days starting today, that means it can be used to enter the Schengen area at any time in the next three months for a maximum of 30 days.

For more information see Entry and stay in Italy
Both short-stay and long-stay visas can be issued for one, two or multiple entries. The number of entries is indicated on the visa application by writing 01 or 02 or MULT, in the case of authorisation to enter more than twice. When entries number more than one, the visa holder is entitled to stay for a period of time or the sum of periods not to exceed the time limit for the stay permitted by the visa, starting from the date of first entry into the Schengen area. Multiple entry visas can also be issued for periods of from 6 months to 5 years, but only in accordance the Uniform Schengen Visa and only in exceptional cases, and must, in any case, comply with the conditions listed in article 24, paragraph 2 of the Visa Code.

For further information see General conditions governing the entrance of foreign nationals to Italy.
To check on the status of your visa application, contact the consulate where you submitted the application.

List of Italian embassies and consulates
Aliens with a uniform short-stay Schengen visa can stay in Italy or another Schengen country for a period of time not to exceed the length of the visa, except in the case of proven inability to leave or in other adequately justified special cases (e.g. business visa extension for negotiations, supplier contacts, etc.).
In such cases the local Police Questura decide on visa extensions.
The long-stay visa permits entry into Italy, but once across the border a residence permit (permesso di soggiorno) is required and is the only document that allows aliens to reside legally in Italy.

For more information see Polizia di stato.
It should also be kept in mind that an alien cannot be considered as having a “right” to a visa but rather a simple “legitimate interest”..
Persons denied visas may lodge a claim with the Tribunale Amministrativo Regionale (T.A.R.) (regional administrative court) of Lazio within 60 days of receipt of notification of denial.
In the case of visas denied for joining or accompanying family members only, eventual claims can be made through a lawyer to the authorised regular court (Tribunale Ordinario) without time limitations.

For more information see Visa Denials.
Applicants are notified of Schengen visa denials and their reasons by means of a form that can be found in the Visa Code.
Applicants are notified of the reasons for denial also in the case of long stay visas.
Denials in the case of Schengen or National Visa not requested for family reasons can be submitted for review by the Tribunale Amministrativo Regionale (T.A.R.) (regional administrative court) of Lazio within 60 days of receipt of notification of denial.
In the case of visas denied for joining or accompanying family members only, eventual claims can be made through a lawyer to the authorised regular court (Tribunale Ordinario) without time limitations.

For more information see Visa Denials.
No, it is not possible to reverse a denial decision, which is final with regard to a specific visa application. Nevertheless, following denial it is possible to submit a new application for visa or a claim to the qualified authorities.
Denials in the case of Schengen or National Visa not requested for family reasons can be submitted for review by the Tribunale Amministrativo Regionale (T.A.R.) (regional administrative court) of Lazio within 60 days of receipt of notification of denial.
In the case of visas denied for joining or accompanying family members only, eventual claims can be made through a lawyer to the authorised regular court (Tribunale Ordinario)without time limitations.
The family members of EU and EEA citizens can apply for visas in accordance with Italian legislative decree 30/2007, art. 2.
The required documentation includes:
  • Visa application (click here)
  • A recent photograph
  • A valid travel document with expiration date of at least 3 months beyond that of the visa requested
  • A marriage certificate or other adequate documentation demonstrating familial relationship
  • In the case of minors, written consent to the issuance of the visa by the other parent
For more information see the Visa Database.
One of the pre-requisites for entry into the Schengen area is that you have sufficient financial resources for the period you are planning to stay.
For more information see Entry into Italy/Financial resources.
Per informazioni dettagliate, vi consigliamo di rivolgersi all'Ufficio visti della Rappresentanza italiana più vicinaor consult your local Italian diplomatic mission.

List of Italian embassies and consulates
Citizens of countries not subject to entry visa requirement for short stays can remain in Italy or the Schengen area for a maximum of 90 out of every 180 days.

For further information see Border Code.
Italian law does not provide for a visa for matrimony, so the type of visa you would apply for would be a tourist visa. See the Visa Database.
The Italian Ministry of Education, Universities and Research (MIUR) annually publishes the norms governing foreign students’ access to Italian university courses of study. See the MIUR website under Studenti stranieri

No. The bank security is not one of the documents necessary to show sufficient means of support for residence in Italy.
You must have provide assurance of sufficient financial resources, either personal means or subsidies from institutions recognised by the Italian government (including universities).

See the MIUR website under Studenti stranieri.
Each year the Italian government makes study bursaries available to foreign citizens or Italian citizens residing abroad.
For all pertinent information see Study bursaries offered by the Italian government to foreign of Italian I.R.E.
Entry into Italy by non-EU citizens for the purposes of non-seasonal and seasonal subordinate work and self-employment occurs mainly within the context of the entry quotas established by the law known as the “decreto flussi”.
The Italian or foreign employer residing in Italy must first apply for clearance (nulla osta al lavoro) at the Sportello Unico per l’Immigrazione of the Prefettura del territorio where the worker will be residing or where the place of work is located.
Once clearance is obtained, you may apply for your visa at your local diplomatic mission.
List of Italian embassies and consulates.
The categories of workers subject to the quota system are listed under art. 27 of the immigration law (testo unico sul’immigrazione).

For more information see the For more information see the and the sites of the Ministry of the Interior and the Polizia di stato.
Foreign academic credentials are not automatically recognised in Italy.
Foreign academic credentials are not automatically recognised in Italy. For all pertinent information see CIMEA (Centro Informazioni sulla Mobilità e le Equivalenze Accademiche).
If you wish to return permanently to Italy after having established residency abroad for at least 12 months you have a right to facilitated customs treatment and – depending on the regional, provincial and local laws – possible financial contributions.

For more information see the website of the Agenzia delle Dogane under Rimpatri.


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