Human Rights

 

Gentiloni a UE. Italia ancora troppo solaIl Ministro degli Affari Esteri e della Cooperazione Internazionale, Paolo Gentiloni, ha avuto stamane un colloquio telefonico con il Commissario europeo all’immigrazione Dimitris Avramopoulos. Il Ministro degli...
Concern over recent violence in BurundiThe Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation expressed concern over the recent violence in Burundi within the context of the campaign for the June presidential elections. The Farnesina urged the...
Italy–BosniaStronger cooperation in the justice sphere Italy and Bosnia Herzegovina are fostering stronger cooperation in the justice sphere. Our Ambassador in Sarajevo, Ugerro Corrias, has met the new Justice Minister, Josip...
Africa and the Mediterranean are a foreign policy priority for Italy says Gentiloni“Africa and the Mediterranean are a foreign policy priority for Italy”, says GentiloniThe Minister for Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Paolo Gentiloni, attended the first working lunch organised by the African diplomatic corps in Rome. The aim...

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The defence of human rights, in addition to reflecting the profound principles that underpin our own political and social systems, are among the main prerequisites for ensuring justice, peace and stability at the international level. That is why Italy continues in its convinced efforts to promote and protect human rights around the world, understood not so much as the sum of all the issues associated with humanitarian and political crises, but as a structural and systematic aspect of foreign policy.

An open-dialogue approach

Italy’s international commitment is based on an open dialogue approach respectful of diversity but founded on the principle of universal human rights. It goes hand-in-hand with support for the social and economic development of the least advantaged nations through cooperation programmes.

Shared standards and mechanisms to monitor compliance

Italy makes use of a series of bilateral and multilateral instruments, both universal and regional. Their general aim is to strengthen shared standards in the field of human rights and design mechanisms by which to monitor compliance with and the  application of those standards. This also involves Italy’s civil society and, in particular, NGOs and citizens’ associations active in this field.


 

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