Disarmament

 

OSCE: Bosnia-Erzegovina, Croazia, Montenegro e Serbia assumono responsabilità applicazione misure disarmo e controllo armamenti prevista da Accordi DaytonNel corso del Consiglio Ministeriale OSCE di Basilea, dove l’Italia è rappresentata dal Ministero degli Affari Esteri e della Cooperazione Internazionale Paolo Gentiloni, Bosnia-Erzegovina, Croazia, Montenegro...
Foreign-Defence – Delegation of EU, NATO and Associate countries visit Palazzo Aeronautica On Saturday 29 November a delegation of European Union, Associated and NATO Country Member ambassadors visited the Palazzo Aeronautica in Rome. The idea was conceived by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International...
Paolo Gentiloni, new Minister for Foreign Affairs installed at the FarnesinaThe Hon. Paolo Gentiloni formally took over as Minister for Foreign Affairs from outgoing Minister Federica Mogherini. The two ministers met for an exchange of views on the main international crisis areas and pending...
Network Farnesina: Organizzazioni Internazionali giuridiche con sede in Italia (in translation)Prima riunione tra Ministero degli Affari Esteri e della Cooperazione Internazionale e vertici delle organizzazioni di diritto internazionale con sede in Italia “Insieme per i diritti umani, lo Stato di diritto...

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The commitment to disarmament, weapons controls and non-proliferation is an essential component of Italian foreign policy. Italy has long been active on various fronts that include the United Nations, the European Union and the G8, as well as in the context of major international review conventions.
Among the most significant results achieved by our country in regard to this sector are the adoption of the European strategy against proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (adopted during the Italian duty Presidency of the EU in 2003) and its participation in the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) aimed at banning trade in weapons of mass destruction.

Italy’s engagement in the context of disarmament and non-proliferation is divided into various sectors in relation to the various categories of existing weapons. The usual distinction made is between conventional weapons and weapons of mass destruction. The former of these, generally considered legitimate, are defined as “conventional” on the basis of two observable characteristics: a relatively contained capacity for causing injury and discriminating effects that allow for the greater protection of the civilian population. The latter, including include nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are distinguished for their enormous, and above all, indiscriminate potential for destruction.

Latest update: 18/07/2013

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