Disarmament

 

Nuclear: Conference in Bologna - “Nuclear Security Summit 2016 and beyond: the role of training and support centers and Centres of Excellence”Ahead of Italy’s participation in the 2016 Nuclear Security Summit, the conference “Nuclear Security Summit 2016 and beyond: the role of training and support centers and Centres of Excellence” was held in...
Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty review conference: Della Vedova in New YorkUnder-Secretary for Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation Benedetto Della Vedova will be in New York tomorrow for the 2015 Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of...
Armi chimiche: a Ypres commemorazione centenario del primo impiego armi chimiche su larga scalaSi è svolta oggi a Ypres, in Belgio, una solenne cerimonia per ricordare il centenario del primo impiego di armi chimiche su larga scala avvenuto nel corso della Prima Guerra Mondiale.Il Direttore Generale dell’Organizzazione...
Organizzazione per la Proibizione delle Armi Chimiche: all’Italia la Presidenza del Consiglio Esecutivo dell’OPACIl Consiglio Esecutivo dell’Organizzazione per la Proibizione delle Armi Chimiche, riunito a L’Aja,ha eletto oggi all’unanimità come suo Presidente l’Ambasciatore Francesco Azzarello, Rappresentante Permanente...

Latest updates

The commitment to disarmament, weapons controls and non-proliferation is an essential component of Italian foreign policy. Italy has long been active on various fronts that include the United Nations, the European Union and the G8, as well as in the context of major international review conventions.
Among the most significant results achieved by our country in regard to this sector are the adoption of the European strategy against proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (adopted during the Italian duty Presidency of the EU in 2003) and its participation in the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) aimed at banning trade in weapons of mass destruction.

Italy’s engagement in the context of disarmament and non-proliferation is divided into various sectors in relation to the various categories of existing weapons. The usual distinction made is between conventional weapons and weapons of mass destruction. The former of these, generally considered legitimate, are defined as “conventional” on the basis of two observable characteristics: a relatively contained capacity for causing injury and discriminating effects that allow for the greater protection of the civilian population. The latter, including include nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are distinguished for their enormous, and above all, indiscriminate potential for destruction.


Tags:

Disarmo

149