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Italian piano music celebrated in Buenos Aires

The Italian Cultural Institute in Buenos Aires presents an original series of concerts via streaming, celebrating Italy by means of piano music. As part of its traditional #Vivacissimo online cycle, now in its fourth season, it has organised three sessions, to be held on 27 August and 9 and 10 September (at 6.30 p.m.).   

The three concerts are set in the marvellous setting of Vicenza’s Teatro Olimpico, a Palladio masterpiece, and will be performed by three of the most active Italian pianists: Roberto Prosseda, Alessandro Marangoni, and Costanza Principe.The three artists have chosen a varied repertoire that share an Italian identity. They are all pieces written by Italians, or by foreign composers inspired by Italy. 

It should be recalled that the piano was invented in Florence, Italy, to be precise by Bartolomeo Cristofori in 1699, and still today one of the best pianos made is that built by the Fazioli Company, which will naturally be used by the three pianists.

 

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For the first concert on 27 August, on the occasion of the Dante anniversary, Roberto Prosseda will present Liszt’s great “Fantaisie après une lecture de Dante”, preceded by Liszt’s “Tre Sonetti del Petrarca”. He will also perform two rare pieces by Ennio Morricone, to whom Prosseda dedicated a Decca CD, with his piano music. The video will also enable you to listen to an original work by Morricone, never recorded before: ‘Rimembranze’ (1946), the first piece registered by Ennio Morricone with the SIAE, the manuscript for which the Morricone family generously made available to Roberto Prosseda.  

The concert on 9 September, by pianist Costanza Principe, includes two famous masterpieces by Bach, deemed to be the father of Western music, linked to Italy for different reasons. In the Italian Concerto of 1735 Bach transfers the dynamic and dramatic contrasts, typical of Italian style Baroque Concertos. The famous Chaconne from Partita for violin No. 2, is presented here in the form of the monumental piano transcription by Ferruccio Busoni, progenitor of modern piano music. 

 

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The concert on 9 September, by pianist Costanza Principe, includes two famous masterpieces by Bach, deemed to be the father of Western music, linked to Italy for different reasons. In the Italian Concerto of 1735 Bach transfers the dynamic and dramatic contrasts, typical of Italian style Baroque Concertos. The famous Chaconne from Partita for violin No. 2, is presented here in the form of the monumental piano transcription by Ferruccio Busoni, progenitor of modern piano music. 

The concert on 10 September by pianist Alessandro Marangoni, will be dedicated entirely to piano music by Italian composers. In particular, the artist will play a repertoire by another great father of the piano, Muzio Clementi: the rare Variations on “Batti Batti, o bel Masetto”, from Mozart’s Don Giovanni. His concert will continue with other rare original piano pieces by Rossini, Busoni, Castelnuovo Tedesco, and De Sabata, taking us on a journey of varied listening, full of new discoveries. 

Registration is obligatory: click here

The concert on 9 September, by pianist Costanza Principe, includes two famous masterpieces by Bach, deemed to be the father of Western music, linked to Italy for different reasons. In the Italian Concerto of 1735 Bach transfers the dynamic and dramatic contrasts, typical of Italian style Baroque Concertos. The famous Chaconne from Partita for violin No. 2, is presented here in the form of the monumental piano transcription by Ferruccio Busoni, progenitor of modern piano music. 

The concert on 10 September by pianist Alessandro Marangoni, will be dedicated entirely to piano music by Italian composers. In particular, the artist will play a repertoire by another great father of the piano, Muzio Clementi: the rare Variations on “Batti Batti, o bel Masetto”, from Mozart’s Don Giovanni. His concert will continue with other rare original piano pieces by Rossini, Busoni, Castelnuovo Tedesco, and De Sabata, taking us on a journey of varied listening, full of new discoveries.